Accessible sights and attractions

Use our filter to find sights and attractions that are accessible to wheelchair users and people with limited mobility.

24 Hits
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

St. Anna's Column

If you continue further south you will reach another famous sight of Innsbruck: St. Ann’s Column. On July 26, 1703 (St. Ann's Day) St. Ann's Column was erected right in the centre of Maria-Theresien-Straße to commemorate the liberation from the Bavarian troops which had invaded Tirol earlier. On top of this Corinthian column built out of red marble is a statue of St. Mary. Surrounding the column are statues of Saints Cassian, Vigilius, George and Ann, built by Christoforo Bendetti, an Italian sculptor from Trento. From St. Ann’s Column we will walk back to the Old Town and the Golden Roof. In front of the Golden Roof we will turn right to Hofgasse. At the end of this lane we will pass the former town gate and reach the Imperial Church.  
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

AUT architektur und tirol barrier-free

Level access, accessible toilet, lift; some exhibition halls on mezzanines - access by short stairs
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Bergisel Ski Jump Stadium barrier-free

Lift suitable for wheelchair users. Panorama restaurant and viewing platform accessible via lift. Blue-badge parking provided. Some stairs between the car park and the ticket office. However, you can drive to the ticket office and park your car afterwards.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

St. James' Cathedral

The cathedral’s large doors can be reached via a metallic ramp, which has a gradient of a bit more than 6 percent. As is the case with many churches, the doors are quite heavy; however the cathedral is accessible by wheelchair users. The heavily baroque style cathedral was built between 1717 and 1724 instead of older churches on the same site. The famous picture of Virgin Mary, named "Mariahilf" (Mary help us) is situated at the altar and was painted by Lukas Cranach the older. The frescos and stucco work were made by the Asam brothers. Every day at 12.12 noon the peace bells ring from the north tower of the cathedral. The tomb of Archduke Maximilian III was erected in 1629 and was part of the church building preceding the cathedral. Please don't take photos during services. In front of the cathedral we will turn left to Pfarrgasse. At the end of Pfarrgasse, to the right you will see the Golden Roof.  
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Carnival and Local History Museum barrier-free

All three floors accessible via lift, accessible toilet, ramp for wheelchair users in every room
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Golden Roof

To get into the Museum Goldenes Dachl you have to call 581 111. A staff member will then come to the side entrance at Pfarrgasse and open the door to the lift which leads to the museum. An accessible, disabled friendly toilet is provided. Amidst the charming Old Town you will find Innsbruck's greatest tourist attraction and certainly its most characteristic landmark: the Golden Roof – a three-story balcony on the central plaza in the heart of the Old Town. The late Gothic oriels are capped with 2,738 gold-plated copper tiles. It was constructed for Emperor Maximilian I to serve as a royal box where he could sit in luxury and enjoy tournaments in the square below. Completed at the dawn of the 16th century, the Golden Roof was built to celebrate Maximilian's second marriage to Bianca Maria Sforza of Milan (Maximilian was a ruler who expanded his territory through marriage, not conquest). Not wishing to alienate his allies gained by the first marriage to Maria of Burgundy he had an image of himself painted between the two women on the balcony. Inside there’s a museum (don’t miss out on the great view from the royal box) and the Golden Roof is also the permanent secretariat of the organisation Commission Internationale pour la Protection des Alpes. After visiting the Golden Roof we will turn southwards to the mediaeval City Tower on the left side. 
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Helbling House barrier-free

If we look to the right – with the Golden Roof behind us – we will see the lavishly adorned Helbling house diagonally opposite of the City Tower. This original 15th century Gothic mansion is an outstanding example of bourgeois grandeur in the Old Town. In 1730 it was richly decorated with stuccos by Anton Gigl. The house is named after Sebastian Helbling, who operated a small café there in the 19th century.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Imperial Palace

The city tour for wheelchair users starts at the Imperial Palace,because next to Rennweg you will find centrally located parking sites for wheelchair users. The Imperial Palace  can be accessed via the court. Opposite of Café Sacher is a small ramp which leads to a bell with a wheelchair symbol. Please ring the bell and the door will open. Via a stair lift you will reach the foyer and another lift will take you to the showrooms. The Imperial Palaces disposes of two accessible, disabled friendly toilets. The showrooms themselves don’t cause any problems. At the end of the 15th century, as Emperor Maximilian I held court in Innsbruck, the Imperial Palace had already had today's dimensions. Empress Maria Theresia renovated the existing palace and gave it its monumental baroque style. One of the many showrooms is the great Festival hall, which once was the most lavish hall in the whole alpine region.  We will then cross the Imperial Palace’s court and get to St. Jacob’s Cathedral in the north. Along the cathedral’s southern side we will reach the main portal in the west.  
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Court Church

The impressive church can easily be explored in a wheelchair. Another ramp leads to a quiet, peaceful court which sometimes is the venue for various events. The Imperial Church harbors the unique (empty) tomb of Emperor Maximilian I who had a large influence on Innsbruck and is buried in Wiener Neustadt. Thirty years after Maximilian’s death were 28 life-size, bronze figures finished, created and cast by artists like Albrecht Dürer. As the figures had never been taken to Wiener Neustadt and remained in Innsbruck, they were brought to the church built between 1553 and 1563. Archduke Ferdinand II and his bourgeois wife Philippine Welser are buried in the Silver Chapel. In the northern bay stands the tomb of the Tyrolean freedom fighter Andreas Hofer who was shot dead in Mantua in 1810. Ramp at the entrance. Church doors are only open during church services. Otherwise access through the adjacent Museum of Tyrolean Folk Art during opening hours. Please contact staff at the museum’s ticket counter.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Golden Roof Museum barrier-free

Museum accessible via lift. Please call museum staff (from Monday to Friday lunch time). Accessible toilet at the museum.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Arsenal Museum barrier-free

All areas are accessible. Accessible toilet provided. Cobbled courtyard which can be used with wheelchairs.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Ottoburg

Opposite of the Gasthof Goldener Adler lies the Ottoburg with its red-white-red shutters. The Ottoburg – an ancient house grown over by wild wine was erected in the 15th century instead of a small castle of the counts of Andechs on orders of Maximilian I. It is directly situated at the old city wall of which parts can be seen still today. For centuries the Ottoburg has been housing an excellent restaurant and wine bar. To the right side of the Ottoburg you will see the Claudiana.  
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Palais Claudiana

To the right side of the Ottoburg you will see the Claudiana. Claudiana, as the former seat of the Tirolean government is called, was named after Claudia de Medici, who had the building reconstructed in the 17th century. A hall with a beautiful wooden renaissance ceiling which was only accessible during festive events was added then. Portraits of her and her fellow peers are replicas of the statues in the Imperial Church. If you enter the building through the left or preferentially the right entrance you will reach a court. 
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

RLB-Kunstbrücke barrier-free

accessible, level access (electric glass door) and lift
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Ambras Castle Innsbruck barrier-free

Some rooms accessible Lower castle: entrance, shop, ticket office, first, second and third chamber of armour Spanish hall: exterior lift provided Upper castle – ground floor: accessible Upper castle, Gothic collection: not accessible Assistance is needed to operate the lifts, please ask at the ticket office.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

City Archives - City Museum

If you enter the building through the left or preferentially the right entrance you will reach a court. Cross the court to get to the disabled friendly entrance to the Town Museum/Archive. A lift takes you to the elevated ground floor of the museum. The town museum presents different aspects of the town’s history in its permanent exhibition. Archive material illustrates Innsbruck’s characteristics concerning its location, foundation and development, the traffic situation, health, culture, sports, tourism, trades, drinking-water supply, … Many paintings of famous Tirolean artists, pictures of the town, mediaeval documents, rare realities, posters and post cards tell interesting stories about the town and its inhabitants. After leaving the Town Museum we will get back to the Claudiana and Herzog-Friedrich-Straße. Now we will continue straight ahead. At the end of Kiebachgasse we will turn left and reach the beginning of Maria-Theresien-Straße after passing through Kolbenturm.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

City Tower (not) barrier-free

As the City Tower is a Historic Place and its existing form has to be preserved, there is no lift and you can only reach its top by climbing 133 steps. Built between 1442 and 1450, this magnificent tower has a 16th century bulbous cupola under which was the flat of the towers warden situated until the 60s of the 20th century. If we look to the right – with the Golden Roof behind us – we will see the lavishly adorned Helbling house diagonally opposite of the City Tower.  
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Taxisgalerie barrier-free

Accessible, level access, lift, accessible toilet
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Tirol Panorama and Imperial Infantry Museum barrier-free

All areas are accessible. Platform lift to the panoramic painting. The Imperial Infantry Museum is connected to the Tirol Panorama, lifts to all floors. Accessible toilet provided. Wheelchair rental.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Tyrolean State Museum barrier-free

Visitors in wheelchairs please use the back entrance. Inside the museum all areas are accessible. Accessible toilet provided.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Museum of Tyrolean Folk Art

If you have enough time it's worth a visit:the Museum of Tyrolean Folk Art houses the most significant collection of cultural treasures from Tyrol’s past. Focal points include arts and crafts, religious folk art, wood-panelled parlours, cribs and festive costumes. All areas are accessible. Accessible toilet is provided.
Share on Facebook
Share on Facebook

Stams Abbey barrier-free

Accessible; abbey church, orangery and restaurant are accessible, accessible toilet, car park
  • 1
unlimited
Weather for morning
morning
Innsbruck
Fineweather: 90%
18°C/64°F
afternoon
Weather for afternoon
afternoon
Innsbruck
Fineweather: 80%
18°C/64°F
Weather for Monday
Monday
Innsbruck
Fineweather: 60%
18°C/64°F
Tuesday
Weather for Tuesday
Tuesday
Innsbruck
Fineweather: 60%
18°C/64°F
morning
Can we help? Contact us.
Innsbruck Tourismus
Mo - Fr: 8.00 am - 5.00 pm
Innsbruck Incoming
Mo - Fr: 9.00 am - 5.00 pm
Tourismus Information, Ticket Service
Mo - Sa: 9.00 am - 6.00 pm
Su: 10.00 am - 4.30 pm